\ John Snow | CWS

Supplementary Documents:
  • 03: John Snow (1849), On the Mode of Communication of Cholera; lightly edited, annotated, images added. Download: PDF
  • 03: Snow's description of the Albion Terrace oubreak (1849), annotated with maps and images by Ralph Frerichs. http://www.ph.ucla.edu/epi/snow/1859map/albionterraceoutbreak_1849_a2.html
  • 04: Edmund A. Parkes (1849), An Inquiry into the Bearing of the Earliest Cases of Cholera, which Occurred in London during the Present Epidemic, on the strict Theory of Contagion. Download: PDF
  • 04: Thomas Wakley's review (1849) of Edmund A. Parkes, Inquiry into the Earliest Cases of Cholera in London. For Wakley's shift to contingent-contagion, see also Document 06. Download: PDF
  • 06: Something happened in England—Wakley's notion of the contingent-contagious nature of Asiatic cholera (April 1832) Download: PDF
  • 09–II: Snow (1849), "On the pathology and mode of communication of cholera." Download: PDF
  • 09–II: Word comparison of Mode of Communication of Cholera and "Pathology and mode of communication of cholera"—an example of his reasoning by repetition and accretion. Download: PDF
  • 10-I: General Board of Health (1850), Extracts from Report on the cholera epidemic of 1848-49. Download: PDF
  • 10-II: General Board of Health (1850), Extracts from Report on the cholera epidemic of 1848-49, Appendix A [John Sutherland]. Download: PDF
  • 10–III: General Board of Health (1850), Extracts from Report on the cholera epidemic of 1848-49, Appendix B [Richard Grainger]. Download: PDF
  • 11: General Register Office [William Farr] (1852), Extracts from Report on the 1848-49 cholera epidemic Download: PDF
  • 13: Snow (1851), "On the mode of propagation of cholera, the paper he partially delivered at the Epidemiological Society." Download: PDF
  • 13: Word comparison of Mode of Communication of Cholera, "Pathology and mode of communication of cholera," and "Mode of propagation of cholera"—another example of his reasoning by repetition and accretion. Download: PDF
  • 14: Snow's investigations of impure water and cholera in South London—Overview. Download: PDF
  • 14–III (a): Snow's "grand experiment"—Genesis of an idea as described in MCC2 (January 1855). Download: PDF
  • 14–IV (b): Initial inquiries, strategy, and a change of plan (September 1854). Download: PDF
  • 14–IV (c): The denominator problem—"31 August 1854," an historical narrative about John Snow and William Farr. Download: PDF
  • 14–IV (c): The denominator problem—Unpacking the "31 August 1854" narrative. Download: PDF
  • 14–IV (c): The denominator problem—Unpacking the narrative, bibliography. Download: PDF
  • 14–IV (d): Preliminary report (October 1854). Download: PDF
  • 14–IV (e): Elaborations of the preliminary report, as described in MCC2 (January 1855). Download: PDF
  • 14–IV (f): The "grand experiment"—Snow's criticism of the General Board of Health's ex post facto investigation (June 1856). http://johnsnow.matrix.msu.edu/work.php?id=15-78-4F
  • 14–IV (g): The "grand experiment"—Snow's final analysis (October 1856). http://johnsnow.matrix.msu.edu/work.php?id=15-78-56
  • 15: Reverend Whitehead's visit with the Plynn family: An experiment in historiography. Download: PDF
  • 16–I: Cholera deaths between 19 August and 9 September reported to the General Register Office by Henry Sibley, the registrar at Middlesex Hospital. Download: PDF
  • 16–II: Florence Nightingale's Sojourn at Middlesex Hospital--an experiment in historiography [interpreting Florence Nightingale's nursing stint at Middlesex Hospital during the outbreak] (revised 10/9/2020). Download: PDF
  • 16–II: Historiographical unpacking of Florence Nightingale's Sojourn at Middlesex Hospital [formulated as a research prospectus to investigate an historical problem] (revised 10/9/2020). Download: PDF
  • 17–I: One of the earliest newspaper accounts of an unusual cholera outbreak in St., James, Westminster. Download: PDF
  • 17–II: The second General Board of Health's notification has been moved to the beginning of Document 17–III below.
  • 17–III: Benjamin Hall's first circular on the prevention of cholera, the appointment of medical inspectors, and the first meeting of the newly appointed medical council. Download: PDF
  • 17–IV: The Broad Street cholera outbreak placed in the context of the ninth week of the London metropolitan epidemic. Download: PDF
  • 18: George Godwin, London Shadows (1854)—Extracts on housing and unsanitary conditions. Download: PDF
  • 19: John Snow's first investigation of the Broad Street outbreak. Download: PDF
  • 20: The General Register Office's list of deaths from cholera that Snow investigated during the first week of September 1854. Download: PDF
  • 23: Instructions to the three investigators assigned by the General Board of Health to undertake house-to-house inquiries in the Broad Street cholera field. Download: PDF
  • 24–I: Joseph Bazalgette assures the Metropolitan Sewer Commissioners that sewer construction poses no hazards during a cholera visitation. Download: PDF
  • 24–II: Transcription of cholera deaths from the Weekly Returns of 2 and 9 September 1854 that Edmund Cooper and his team investigated and used in preparing the "Schedule" and Frontage Plan requested by the Metropolitan Commission of Sewers. Download: PDF
  • 24–III: The chairman of the Metropolitan Commission of Sewers states that the Cooper report exonerates the sewers from public suspicion that they caused the Broad Street cholera outbreak. Download: PDF
  • 26–II: Snow's MCC2 account of his Broad Street outbreak investigations from September to November 1854. Download: PDF
  • 26–IV: An edited and annotated transcription of "Dr. Snow"s Report," presented to the Cholera Inquiry Committee for St. James, Westminster parish on 12 December 1854, but not published until the summer of 1855. Download: PDF
  • 28: Report by the three special investigators hired by the General Board of Health to undertake house-to-house inquiries in the Broad Street cholera field. Download: PDF
  • 30–I: St. James, Westminster parish records of this local authority's response to the cholera epidemics of 1853–54. Download: PDF
  • 30–II: Henry Whitehead's report on the outbreak in a single street shows his evolution as an epidemiological investigator, his changing views of Snow's cholera theory, and his identification of a potential primary case that had eluded Snow. Download: PDF
  • 30–III: Jehoshaphat York finds a "fatal communication" between the sewer drain coming from 40 Broad Street and the well lining under the Broad Street pump. Download: PDF
  • 30–IV: The Cholera Inquiry Committee's general report on the cholera outbreak in St. James parish. Download: PDF
  • 31–I, II, III, IV: Reports from the medical council to Benjamin Hall, President of the 2nd General Board of Health. Download: PDF
  • Guidelines for constructing a research prospectus and a research essay [a companion to 16:II, historiographical unpacking]. Download: PDF
  • Holistic (Hippocratic) Equilibrium Model and the Disease Continuum for Asiatic Cholera. Download: PDF
  • Streeter, Richard: "Eliza Reid (1841–54)"—a genealogical and historical narrative of one of the earliest victims of the Broad Street cholera outbreak. http://johnsnow.matrix.msu.edu/work.php?id=15-78-292